Battle of Belly: 75-80% of Immunity starts in the gut - Active. Healthy. Well.

IMPORTANT! BATTLE FOR YOUR BELLY – 75-80% of your immunity and what you look and feel like is related to DIET. The saying you are what you eat holds true. More research is leading back to diet causing the following issues including: allergies, arthritis, asthma, autoimmune diseases, depression, headache, fatigue, infections, muscle pain, liver problems, osteoporosis, thyroid, and more. So, what can you do about it? Start by eating clean, Eliminate wheat products (gluten) and sugar (yes sugar, I know it will be hard), Add Probiotics and Digestive enzymes to your daily diet.

Probiotics

Probiotic organisms are live microorganisms that are thought to be beneficial to the host organism. According to the currently adopted definition by FAO/WHO, probiotics are: “Live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host”.[1] Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bifidobacteria are the most common types of microbes used as probiotics; but certain yeasts and bacilli may also be used. Probiotics are commonly consumed as part of fermented foods with specially added active live cultures; such as in yogurt, soy yogurt, or as dietary supplements.

Many people use probiotics to prevent diarrhea, gas, and cramping caused by antibiotics. Antibiotics kill “good” (beneficial) bacteria along with the bacteria that cause illness. A decrease in beneficial bacteria may lead to digestive problems. Taking probiotics may help replace the lost beneficial bacteria. This can help prevent diarrhea.

A decrease in beneficial bacteria may also lead to other infections, such as vaginal yeast and urinary tract infections, and symptoms such as diarrhea from intestinal illnesses.

Probiotics may also be used to:

Help with other causes of diarrhea.
Help prevent infections in the digestive tract.
Help control immune response (inflammation), as in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Probiotics are being studied for benefits in colon cancer, skin infections, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

WebMD Medical Reference

Digestive Enzymes

Digestive enzymes are enzymes that break down polymeric macromolecules into their smaller building blocks, in order to facilitate their absorption by the body. Digestive enzymes are found in the digestive tracts of animals (including humans) and in the traps of carnivorous plants, where they aid in the digestion of food, as well as inside cells, especially in their lysosomes, where they function to maintain cellular survival. Digestive enzymes are diverse and are found in the saliva secreted by the salivary glands, in the stomach secreted by cells lining the stomach, in the pancreatic juice secreted by pancreatic exocrine cells, and in the intestinal (small and large) secretions, or as part of the lining of the gastrointestinal tract.

Digestive enzymes are classified based on their target substrates:

proteases and peptidases split proteins into small peptides and amino acids.
lipases split fat into three fatty acids and a glycerol molecule.
carbohydrases split carbohydrates such as starch and sugars into simple sugars such as glucose.
nucleases split nucleic acids into nucleotides.

In the human digestive system, the main sites of digestion are the oral cavity, the stomach, and the small intestine. Digestive enzymes are secreted by different exocrine glands including:

Salivary glands
Secretory cells in the stomach
Secretory cells in the pancreas
Secretory glands in the small intestine

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Benny Jones

Owner at LifeMeds LLC
Benny earned a Bachelor of Science from the University of Florida in Exercise and Sport Science. Benny believes a well balanced wellness program should encompass flexibility, strength, balanced clean diet, and proper rest. Connect with us on our Google Plus Page Active. Healthy. Well.